Monday, February 28, 2011

Libya Latest

  • Reuters: Anti-Gaddafi protesters have shot down a military aircraft and captured its crew near Misrata, West Libya

    France has announced it is sending two planes with humanitarian aid to the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi.
    Francois Fillon, the French prime minister, said the planes would leave "in a few hours" for Benghazi with doctors, nurses, medicines and medical equipment.
    "It will be the beginning of a massive operation of humanitarian support for the populations of liberated territories," he told RTL radio.

  • The Reuters news agency reports opponents of the Libyan leader have held off an attack by pro-government forces and shot down a military aircraft near the town of Misurata.
    An aircraft was shot down this morning while it was firing on the local radio station. Protesters captured its crew," Reuters reported, citing a witness, Mohamed.
    "Fighting to control the military air base (near Misurata) started last night and is still going on. Gaddafi's forces control only a small part of the base. Protesters control a large part of this base where there is ammunition."
    "Misurata is still under the control of the protesters," he said.

  • The UN Human Rights Council is now meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, and the events in Libya are part of the discussions. Western leaders are becoming increasingly outspoken against Gaddafi, calling for him to go.
    Russia's foreign minister Sergei Lavrov is addressing the Council meeting now. He said the use of military force against civilians in Libya is unacceptable.

  • The Associated Press news agency reports residents of  the Libyan capital say prices for basic foods are skyrocketing, and long lines are forming at bakeries for rationed bread.
    One resident tells AP that the price of rice, a main staple, has gone up 500 per cent, reaching the equivalent of $40 for a five kilogram bag.


  • Another set of photos from Evan Hill, our web producer in Benghazi, where the uprising has left former bastions of the regime's security forces crumbling, burned and littered with official files, some of them containing sensitive information.